The Zombie Tax

Years ago, Hawaii had an estate tax, but it was a “pickup” tax – the amount of the tax was offset by an equal credit against Federal tax, so it was not “felt” by the heirs as a separate tax. Then, the credit was eliminated, and the tax went with it.  But in 2010, it rose from the dead, like a zombie, and while it’s not hungry for brains, it IS hungry for a nice, juicy piece of the estate you were hoping to leave to your kids and other beneficiaries.  Here are a few tidbits about this ‘zombie tax’:

– The tax ‘kicks in’ when your total estate (which includes all of the property and assets you leave behind, including your retirement accounts and often the full proceeds of life insurance payable on your death) is valued at $3.5 million or more.

– Although Hawaii has no gift tax, due to a quirk in the way the law is written, your heirs may still end up paying Hawaii estate tax on your lifetime gifts, after you die. So you may have to include those gifts when determining whether the tax will apply to your estate.

– The Federal estate tax now has an exemption of $5 million per person (until 12/31/2012).So, you may not have an estate that is taxable by the IRS, but it may still be taxed by the state of Hawaii.

– Although (until 12/31/2012, if not extended) you may be able to use your deceased spouse’s unused FEDERAL exemption (that is, if he or she used less than the full $5 million exemption when he or she died, before you), there is no such “portability” of the Hawaii exemption. So if a couple does not plan properly, some of their total $7 million Hawaii exemption ($3.5 mil/spouse) could be wasted, and tax paid unnecessarily.

– If you (and your spouse together, if you’re married) have property worth more than $3.5 million, and you have will(s) or trust(s) that were prepared before 2010, your heirs may end up having to pay a hefty Hawaii estate tax if you don’t have your documents REVIEWED and UPDATED to plan for this ‘zombie’ tax.

– Properly drafted documents can help you to avoid any tax (even the zombie tax) when the first spouse dies, and to use both exemptions fully, to avoid paying any unnecessary tax.

– There are ways to avoid or minimize the taxes paid (both Federal and State), even you have a very large estate.

So, if you have not had your documents reviewed by an experienced estate planner in the past two years, you should do it now – or the Zombie Tax may devour your estate!

Published in: on August 15, 2011 at 7:35 am  Leave a Comment  

Hawaii Asset-Protection Trusts, Rev. 2.0

Well, despite having royally screwed it up the first time, it seems the state legislature has finally put together asset-protection trust legislation for Hawaii that is not altogether horrible. Although not quite in the league of Nevada, Alaska or South Dakota, Hawaii’s new domestic asset protection trust will no doubt be appealing to many who would like to have some home-grown protection for their local real property, and perhaps for other assets as well.

The new, improved “Permitted Transfers in Trust Act,” effective July 1, 2011, provides a welcome alternative for Hawaii residents, and non-resident owners of Hawaii real property, who are looking to shelter some of their assets from future creditors. Unlike the prior version of the law (which had much in common with many “1.0” versions of software, i.e., lots of bugs), the new law allows real estate to be put into a Hawaii asset-protection trust; eliminates the requirement that the trust property comprise no more than 25% of the settlor’s net worth; and – most significantly – repeals the 1% tax imposed on transfers into these trusts, which had rendered the prior law “dead on arrival”.

The new law allows the creation of an irrevocable trust, the corpus of which will, after two years, be protected from all new claims against the settlor except for  specified exceptions: alimony or child support; property division on divorce, IF the transfer into trust was made during the marriage or in some cases, within 30 days prior to it; personal injury or property damage claims arising from acts that occurred before the transfer into trust; debts secured (expressly or impliedly, not exactly sure how that will be interpreted) by trust property; and tax liabilities.

The settlor may retain significant powers and rights, including the power to veto distributions, to serve as investment advisor, to replace a trustee or advisor, a testamentary limited power of appointment, the right to all income (or to a unitrust amount not to exceed 5% annually), and the right to distributions in the discretion of the trustee, without losing the desired creditor protection.

Even if creditor protection is not required or desired, a trust that conforms to the statute may be of perpetual duration – thus, obtaining all of the benefits of a trust structure for multiple generations (i.e., a dynasty trust).  Specific allowance is made for the necessary provisions of a QPRT or GRAT, so that those types of trusts can also take advantage of the benefits conferred by the new statute. And, property held by a married couple as ‘tenants by the entirety’ will not lose the benefits of that tenancy when it is put into one of these trusts.

If you are concerned about the vulnerability of your property – including what we all hold so dear, that “little piece of Hawaii” that is our home or our living, in the form of business or rental property – to potential, future claims of creditors, OR if you would like to create a permanent legacy for your family in the form of a dynasty trust, that can carry the benefits of your hard work or good fortune through many generations, you might want to consider setting up a Hawaii asset-protection trust.   It is never too soon to get that two-year ‘statute of limitations’ running!

Published in: on August 15, 2011 at 7:09 am  Leave a Comment  
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